Michael Olivero
The official blog of Michael Olivero, Software Architect & Humble Entrepreneur

Web-Based Microsoft Office To Come - Confirmed

Monday, 13 July 2009 21:16 by Michael Olivero
One must ask, should I go or not?  If I don't then the others will get all the show and will take the lime light as the innovators.  If I do, then I am implicitly validating their business model by merely presenting an alternative. For quite some time, Microsoft has resisted the open source movement with Linux calling it a "cancer" as Balmer once said to openly adopting it in others. Evidently they switched their tactic numerous times, even internally creating rift between those who agree and disagree with the model. Similarly with web based applications, or cloud computing as commonly referred to, Microsoft has had it's fair share of decisions to make.  Google innovated quite some time ago with the opening of their online Gmail.  The splashing surprise was the 1GB of storage they were offering all users -- leap and bounds beyond Hotmail and others which averged a mere 10mb. Slowly but surely, additional apps followed branded under the Google Docs -- an excel equivalent, a word equivalent, etc.  Under this type of pressure, after months and perhaps years of discounting the threat and trying alternatives -- ultimately caved in on July 13, 2009 and decided to officially offer a free web-based office suite.  Interestingly enough, it was only a few days after Google removed the "Beta" tag off theirs. http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/200907131014DOWJONESDJONLINE000386_FORTUNE5.htm
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Google now brining the cloud into Outlook?

Tuesday, 9 June 2009 23:17 by Michael Olivero
Google claims it sometimes hits a snag when pushing Google Apps products like Gmail to enterprises, meeting major resistance from users comfortable with the look and feel of Microsoft Outlook. So on Tuesday, the Mountain View, Calif.-based search giant unveiled Google Apps Sync for Microsoft Outlook, a plug-in for Outlook 2003 and 2007 that presents users with the familiar Outlook user interface but runs e-mail through Google's cloud rather than Microsoft Exchange. http://www.crn.com/software/217800408
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Event registration in C# 2.0

Friday, 26 September 2008 20:11 by Michael Olivero
The C# 2.0 (and newer) compiler is smart enough to determine the type of delegate with which a particular event is implemented. This "delegate inference" capability enables you to omit the declaration of the requisite delegate in the code that registers an event handling method with an event. Consider the following 1.x code that registers an event handling method with an event. This code explicitly instantiates the event handler (delegate) in order to register the associated method with the event.
thePublisher.EventName += new MyEventHandlerDelegate(EventHandlingMethodName);
The following 2.0+ code uses delegate inference to register the same method with the event. Notice the following code appears to register the event handling method directly with the event.
thePublisher.EventName += EventHandlingMethodName;
When you assign the method name directly to the event like that, the C# compiler ensures that the method signature matches the signature of the event handler upon which the event is based. The C# compiler then inserts the requisite delegate registration code (i.e., ... += new MyEventHandlerDelegate(EventHandlingMethodName);) in the output assembly. This simplified syntax is made possible by the C# compiler, and not by any change to the fundamental ways that events are implemented in the .NET Framework. To be clear, it is not the case that events in C# 2.0 (and newer) can directly reference methods. What the compiler is doing for us is supplying the [still] requisite delegate syntax in the output assembly — as if we had explicitly instantiated the delegate. Clipped from: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/event_fundamentals.aspx
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Google Releases New Browser - Chrome

Tuesday, 2 September 2008 15:34 by Michael Olivero
Google today has officially thrown it's knock-out swing at Microsoft with the release of the official Google Chrome browser.  This is not a knock out punch, but a definitely a knockout swign destined to be a punch over the next few months. For an entire overview of Google Chrome and it's advance features view this mini overview in the form of a comic: http://www.google.com/googlebooks/chrome/ To download now: http://www.google.com/chrome One thing to note, Google Chrome has following user agent which indicates it's based on the well known webkit open source browser commonly used by Apple Safari browser. Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 6.0; en-US) AppleWebKit/525.13 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/0.2.149.27 Safari/525.13
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Vista for business?

Friday, 25 July 2008 23:29 by Michael Olivero

Is Windows Vista ready for business? I was dealing with this issue for weeks with Vista until our network administrator suggested we do a clean install. Well after the clean install things got better, but still this should not have happened with a new computer from dell. Note, this was in the early months of Windows Vista official launch and things have gotten better since then with the service pack and other updates.

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60 percent skipping Vista, so Ballmer looks to Apple

Friday, 25 July 2008 02:50 by Michael Olivero
Found this article interesting: Excerpt from: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13505_3-9998885-16.html "In an email sent by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer to Microsoft employees, Ballmer argued that "the success of Windows is our number one job," while acknowledging that to compete with little Apple that it outsells "30-to-1" it will change the way it works with hardware companies to try to catch up. Indeed, I've been hearing rumors for some time that Microsoft is planning to launch mobile phone interfaces to compete with Apple's iPhone, with a touch-screen UI that will make people "salivate." The problem with this game of catch-up is that it's just that: If you're not leading, you've got to beat the leader on price or some other feature. Witness Microsoft's Zune if you think it's good enough to come out with a good but not better competitor to Apple. So, while Ubuntu's Mark Shuttleworth talks about being better than Apple, the best Ballmer can do is to aspire to be like Apple. It won't work. Ballmer ended his missive to Microsoft employees by demanding that people believe that Microsoft is "the best in the world at doing software and nobody should be confused about this." Unfortunately, they are, Mr. Ballmer. People are very confused on that point. They're doing all sorts of whacky things like using Linux for servers, Apple for mobile and desktops, MySQL for databases, etc. People have become very confused. They no longer think Microsoft writes the best software. That, Mr. Ballmer, is Microsoft's big problem. Microsoft is no longer the provider of the industry's best software. Not by a long shot."
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Vista not acting nice with SSD drives?

Thursday, 24 July 2008 03:06 by Michael Olivero
Excerpt from this URL: http://www.macobserver.com/article/2008/07/23.13.shtml "SanDisk, a maker of Solid Stated Drives (SSD), said on Monday that Vista is not optimized for those kinds of drives, and suitable SSDs won't be available until late this year or next year. The SanDisk CEO admitted that his company didn't understand the limitations of Vista. SSDs are currently available as options for the Apple MacBook Air and Toshiba Portege R500. SandDisk's CEO, Eli Harari, spoke to the issue at their second quarter conference call and said that the design of Vista presents a challenge. "As soon as you get into Vista applications in notebook and desktop, you start running into very demanding applications because Vista is not optimized for flash memory solid-state disk," he said."
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